By Sophia Susi

Right now, millions of animals are held captive inside cages in laboratories across the country. They suffer from pain and frustration and long to be free. It’s no secret that many animals are used for cosmetic testing throughout the U.S.
 
Although some experiments conducted on animals are required by law, most of them are not. The European Union, India, and Israel have placed bans on cosmetic animal testing.
 
I can’t argue with the fact that experiments on animals can make cosmetics safer for humans to use, but torturing the animals is not necessary: “More than 100 million animals suffer and die in the U.S. every year in chemical, drug, food, and cosmetics tests as well as in medical training exercises”. If these poor, defenseless animals weren’t used for the non-required tests, so many animals would go unharmed.
 
Some examples of animal tests include forcing rats and mice to inhale toxic fumes, force feeding dogs pesticides, and dripping corrosive chemicals into rats’ sensitive eyes. Even if the product hurts the animals, it can still be sold to people. Also, even if a product doesn’t harm an animal, it’s not guaranteed to be safe for humans.
 
Animal testing is expensive, but it comes as a surprise to many people that these tests are paid for by health charities and taxpayers’ money. Instead of using their money for things that are really important, people waste precious dollars on experiments that subject animals to pain and sadness.
 
Even though we can’t stop all animal testing, there are many things we can do to help to prevent animal suffering. One thing you can do is buy cruelty-free products. Also, only donate to charities that do not put their money towards animal testing. So, next time you’re in the drugstore browsing for shampoo or searching for cleaning supplies, make sure you check the brand to see if they are cruelty free─ you never know if what you are using in your daily life was made involving the harm of innocent animals.

Photo courtesy of http://www.trueactivist.com/cosmetic-testing-is-now-banned-in-new-zealand/

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