SURPRISE!

Two articles in one day?! What a treat!

Ever since we were in kindergarten, we’ve been told about our five senses. Eyes, Noses, Mouths, Ears, and Hands are the main helpers for observing the outside world. However, lately scientists have made some interesting discoveries.

First, let’s start with the basics. The definition of a “sense,” according to todayifoundout.com, is “any system that consists of a group of sensory cell types that respond to a specific physical phenomenon and that corresponds to a particular group of regions within the brain where the signals are received and interpreted.” Woah. So, putting this into middle-school-student-speak, a sense is any group of cells that can react to the outside environment.

In that case, how many do we actually have? Apparently, about 18-21:

Sight
Smell
Taste
Hearing
Touch
Pressure
Itch
Thermoception (ability to sense heat and cold)
Proprioception (ability to know where your body parts are)
Tension Sensors
Noniception/Pain
Equilibrioception (ability to keep your balance)
Stretch Receptors
Chemoreceptors (aids in the ability to vomit)
Thirst
Hunger
Magnetoception (ability to sense magnetic fields in the Earth–birds have a very strong sense of this)
Time
And More!

So the next time your science teacher tells you to observe something using the five senses, let them know you can use all 18.

MYTH:
DEBUNKED